Safety Group: 'Water Walking' Toys Too Risky

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The Consumer Product Safety Commission warned Thursday that the increasingly popular water walking balls seen at amusement parks, resorts, and sporting events could potentially be deadly.

People can walk on water by stepping into the large, inflatable toys which are then sealed tight with the rider inside.

Each clear plastic ball is about 6 feet in diameter, but CPSC says that's not enough space for adequate breathing and could lead to suffocation. The group also warned of carbon dioxide buildup inside the balls and the risk of drowning if the ball were punctured.

"The fact that the product has no emergency exit and can be opened only by a person outside of the ball significantly heightens the risk of injury or death when a person inside the ball experiences distress," CPSC officials said in a press release. Read the complete CPSC press release here.

The government group is urging consumers not to use the balls because of these dangers, as well as the risk of impact injury since the toys are unpadded.

There have been two reports of injuries that the CPSC is aware of so far. A child was found unresponsive inside a ball, and one person fractured a bone after the ball fell out of an above-ground pool.

CPSC said it has informed state amusement park officials about the deadly risks associated with the toy.

The water walking balls have several brand and ride names. CPSC said the toys are also available for personal use and have been used on ice and grass.

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