Engineers Say New Levees Ready for Isaac

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Hurricane Isaac will provide a test for the levee system that was rebuilt after Hurricane Katrina.

The failure of the levees and flood walls were largely the cause of the 2005 catastrophic damage in New Orleans, which sits largely below sea level.

CBN News Reporter Mark Martin went to the city one year after Katrina to see how construction of the new system was going.

"We're building never-before type structures at an unprecedented rate, and we're trying to do it as fast as we can," Chris Accardo, operations chief for the Corp of Engineers, told CBN News in 2006.

Now that the system is complete, today the Army Corp of Engineers is confident the levees will hold for Isaac and future storms.

"We're very confident that it's going to work," engineer Mike Stack said. "We've done a lot of work over the last seven years."

He added that more than $14 billion was put into developing the hurricane system, which he said takes on a completely new design for "a much larger and robust system."

"We worked a lot on foundations to make things stronger so it can stand up to those larger surge levels," Stack explained.

"The system naturally has flood gates in it that have to be closed as the storm is coming in [and] we're very confident that we're going to be able to get through this event," he said.

Stack also told CBN News the new system is designed to withstand a much stronger hurricane than Isaac.

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