Stats Aplenty, Facts Fewer in Power Plant Debate

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WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama's new pollution limits for power plants have set off an avalanche of information.

About what the rules will cost, how they'll affect your health and how far they'll go toward curbing climate change.

There's just one problem: Almost none of the information is based in reality.

That's because Obama's proposal relies on states developing their own plans to meet their targets.

Among the options are switching to cleaner fuel sources, boosting efficiency to reduce demand for electricity and trading pollution permits.

At the earliest, states won't submit plans until mid-2016. Some states could have until 2018. So the true impact won't be known for years.

But that's not stopping the White House, environmental groups and the energy industry from serving up speculation in heaping doses.

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Josh Lederman

Josh Lederman

The Associated Press is the backbone of the world's information system serving thousands of daily newspaper, radio, television and online customers with coverage in all media and news in all formats. It is the largest and oldest news organization in the world, serving as a source of news, photos, graphics, audio and video.