Egyptian Judge Turns Cameras Off at Mubarak Trial

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The presiding judge in the trial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, 83, ended television coverage on Monday, the second day of the proceedings.

Judge Ahmed Refaat said the ruling was meant "to protect the public."

Images of Mubarak laying on a hospital gurney in the defendant's caged dock -- a standard part of Egyptian criminal trials -- inflamed the public. On the first day of the trial, clashes took place between Mubarak supporters and anti-government protesters watching the proceedings on an oversized screen outside the building.

Mubarak and his two sons, Gamal and Alaa, are charged with ordering the killing of unarmed protesters during the 18-day uprising that toppled his government -- charges that carry a potential death penalty.

The former president and his sons are also charged with corruption. Nearly 900 people died during the 18 days of rioting, which spread from Cairo to other Egyptian cities.

Speaking from inside the caged dock on the first day of the trial, Mubarak "categorically" denied "all the charges."

Some of the people waiting to watch day two of the trial outside the courtroom were miffed with the judge's ruling.

One protester tweeted, "Did we spend 23 days on the streets so that they show us Mubarak twice?" The New York Times reported.

Mounted police, backed by armored personnel carriers, joined hundreds of riot police to prevent clashes between supporters of the former president and anti-government protesters. 

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