New Egypt PM Names Most of New Cabinet

Ad Feedback

CAIRO - Egypt's prime minister-designate named a caretaker Cabinet on Sunday to help lead the country through reforms and toward free elections after the uprising that ousted President Hosni Mubarak.

The changes include new faces in the key foreign, interior and justice ministries - a decision expected to be met with the approval of the pro-reform groups that led an 18-day uprising that force Mubarak to step down on Feb. 11.

Meanwhile, hundreds of protesters staging a rally outside the Interior Ministry in Cairo, which houses offices the hated State Security agency, was violently broken up.

Protesters have over the past two days rallied outside some dozen state security offices across the nation. In many cases, protesters stormed the buildings, including the main State Security headquarters in the Cairo suburb of Nasr City. The protests followed reports that agents were burning and shredding documents to destroy evidence that would incriminate them in possible cases of human rights abuses.

On Sunday, army soldiers fired in the air and used stun guns to disperse a crowd that wanted to storm the State security offices inside the Interior Ministry in downtown Cairo. The protesters said they wanted to see for themselves whether the building had secret cells and to stop officers from destroying documents.

Thugs armed with rocks, firebombs and machetes also charged at the protesters, but it was not immediately known who had sent them. State TV said 27 arrests were made at the scene.

The State Security agency, which employs about 100,000 of Egypt's 500,0000-strong security forces, is blamed for the worst human rights abuses against Mubarak's opponents.

Dismantling the agency has been a key demand of the protest groups that led the uprising.

In a move clearly designed to respond to such demands, Prime Minister designate Essam Sharaf has named a new interior minister. Maj. Gen. Mansour el-Essawy, a former Cairo security chief, was expected to replace Mahmoud Wagdi, who has held the post for less than a month.

The Interior Ministry is in charge of the security forces.

El-Essawy, according to a report by the state news agency, pledged after meeting Sharaf that he would work to restore security and reduce the role of the State Security.

Sharaf met with 22 other ministerial nominees, including Nabil Elaraby, expected to be Egypt's foreign minister. Elaraby will replace Foreign Minister Ahmed Aboul-Gheit who has held the job since 2004, but has been maligned by the protesters because of his criticism of the uprising in its early days.

Elaraby was Egypt's U.N. representative in the 1990s and served as a judge in the International Court of Justice between 2001 and 2006. He was critical of the government's crackdown against the uprising and was a member of a committee to advise protest leaders on their reform demands.

The new Cabinet also includes a new justice minister, replacing one who was considered a close Mubarak ally and whose dismissal was demanded by the opposition groups.

The new Cabinet has to be approved and sworn in by Egypt's military rulers.

Nasser Abdel-Hamid, a protest leader and member of the Youth Coalition, said the new cabinet lineup was acceptable because it did not include Mubarak loyalists.

"Most of them are experts in their field, and have a good history," he said.

Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

Log in or create an account to post a comment.  

CBN IS HERE FOR YOU!

Are you seeking answers in life? Are you hurting? Are you facing a difficult situation?

Find peace with God, discover more about God or send us your prayer request.

Call The 700 Club Prayer Center at 1 (800) 823-6053, 24 hours a day.

A caring friend will be there to pray with you in your time of need.

Sarah El Deeb

Sarah El Deeb

Associated Press

The Associated Press is the backbone of the world's information system serving thousands of daily newspaper, radio, television and online customers with coverage in all media and news in all formats. It is the largest and oldest news organization in the world, serving as a source of news, photos, graphics, audio and video.