Afghan Suicide Bomber Wounds Dozens of US Troops

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Seventy-seven U.S. troops were wounded, two Afghan civilians killed, and 25 injured when a Taliban suicide bomber blew up his bomb-laden truck at the entrance to a coalition base on Saturday.

The attack came a day before Americans commemorated the 10th anniversary of the al Qaeda-led terror attacks on September 11, 2001, which killed nearly 3,000 people. 

The Taliban claimed responsibility for Saturday's bombing in east central Afghanistan, a spokeswoman for the International Security Assistance Force confirmed, CNN reported.

Lt. Gen. John R. Allen, commander of U.S. and coalition forces, said a "high-profile" attack is often the Taliban's "only ability to influence the battlefield."

"This attack was a high-profile attack," Allen told CNN's Suzanne Malveaux on Sunday. "It was a pretty significant suicide vehicle bomb."

According to the report, the suicide bomber, driving a truck that appeared to be transporting firewood, detonated his payload at the entrance to the base.

The ISAF said the post's protective barrier absorbed most of the blast and none of the injuries appeared to be life threatening.

In a video commemorating the 10th anniversary of 9/11, released by the ISAF Saturday, Allen predicted NATO forces "will prevail" against the Taliban.

The U.S. initiated Operation Enduring Freedom in October 2001, one month after the 9/11 terror attacks.

Last month, 71 U.S. soldiers were killed in Afghanistan, the highest number of casualties in the 10-year war.

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