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When Choosing Faith Means Choosing Death

Rachel Scott was targeted and murdered because of her Christian faith in 1999 during the Columbine shootings. Rachel’s mother, Beth Nimmo discusses her daughter’s legacy showcased in the new film, “I'm Not Ashamed." Read Transcript


After Rachel Scott died, her funeral

was broadcast worldwide on CNN, and more viewers

watched that than the funeral for Princess Diana.

Rachel Scott was just 17 when she died.

Her courageous stance at the end of her life

has inspired millions in the years since.

NARRATOR: On April 20, 1999, two gunmen murdered 13 people

at Columbine High School.

17-year-old Rachel Scott was one of the victims.

Her strong faith permeated her life, her journals, and even

the books written about her after her death.

Now her story comes to the big screen.

"I'm Not Ashamed" opens in theaters October 21.

Rachel's mother, Beth Nimmo, joins us now.

Beth, it's nice to have you on "The 700 Club."

Thank you.

I'm happy to be here.

17 years have passed.

Goodness, it doesn't even seem possible to me,

when I know that in my head.

But does it ever-- does the pain ever go away?

I mean, the loss of a child is such a deep-seated thing.

Well, the loss is always there, but the Lord

is faithful to heal your heart.

You come to a point where you don't cry all day long,

you can sleep at night again, you

can remember her without tears, and there's laughter.

But that's a process.

And it doesn't come easily.

And you have to want that.

You have to want to be healed, you know.

And so we've had to work at that, because it

left such a hole in our lives.

TERRY MEEUWSEN: Oh, I can't imagine.

After her death, you discovered six diaries.

I mean, she was quite the writer-- and the artist

as well-- but what did she write about in her diaries?

Well, there were actually more than six.

They were everywhere.

We found them.

But she was having a conversation with the Lord

in a lot of these writings.

She was leaving us her story.

She was telling us what was happening at her school,

with her friends.

And then she was writing about her relationship with the Lord.

And the Lord in turn would inspire her,

I believe, to leave very prophetic writings.

And those were what we took away,

as far as, this is the real story--

the backstory of Columbine, that we need to share.

Speaking of prophetic, there was

a sketch, a picture that she drew in one of her journals.

Was it the morning of--

It was.

--the day that she died?

It was.

That morning of April the 20th of 1999,

she sat in class, going from class to class, drawing.

The Lord just was inspiring to draw.

And what she didn't know was, she

was drawing what was going to be happening within the hour.

And it shows a picture of weeping eyes

with a stream of blood coming from her temple, which

was the fatal shot for her.

And it goes down under the eyes, and there are

13 teardrops in that picture.

And there will be 13 murdered that day.

TERRY MEEUWSEN: Unbelievable.

BETH NIMMO: And she's a teardrop in her own picture.

Wow.

There are so many people, at the time and since then,

inspired by Rachel's courage, for one thing,

by the depth of her faith, by her strength

in the midst of such adverse, terrifying circumstances.

Did her inspiration in the lives of other people

help you as you dealt with your own pain and loss?

Well, we saw purpose in what God was doing.

And because He prepared her for that,

she had many writings about a premature death.

On April the 20th of 1998, she wrote, it's like a heavy heart,

this burden on my back.

And then she goes on to talk about,

I'm not going to apologize for speaking the name of Jesus.

I'm not going to hide the light they've put in me.

And if I have to sacrifice everything, I will.

I will take it.

Well, one year to that day she keeps that vow.

And two weeks after that writing,

she writes, this will be my last year, Lord.

I've gotten what I can.

Thank You.

And then, two weeks prior to her death,

she writes a drowning poem.

And the last stanza of that is, it isn't suicide.

I consider it homicide.

The world you have created has led to my death.

TERRY MEEUWSEN: Wow.

And we've created a world where our children are dying

for very sad, sad reasons.

And I believe God was just preparing her as a voice,

and as a witness of light to come out of a very dark day.

And may be preparing you, too, Beth.

Because now, these many years later, when what she spoke

was prophetic, and we have seen a generation of children

lost without understanding their rich spiritual heritage,

without feeling a sense of purpose in their lives.

Now the film, "I'm Not Ashamed."

Why now?

Well, the timing is right.

We tried to do this a few years before I had partnered

with a man, been a prophet.

And we tried to do this back in 2008,

and it just wasn't allowed to happen and come together.

I believe the time is ripe now.

Social media is making every effort

to redefine who our children are.

And they're caught up in this vast current

that they don't know how to get out of.

And we're trying to bring things back full circle,

back into the family.

Bring the authority back into the family,

bring the foundations back into the family.

And one of the things Rachel left on the back of a dresser,

that we found a year after her death,

was her hands that she had sketched.

And in the middle of those it said,

"These hands belong to Rachel Joy Scott,

and will someday touch millions of people's hearts."

So it's the heart that we're after.

What's it been like for you to do

a film about such a violent and devastating scenario?

It must take you back to relive this whole thing again.

How have you handled that?

Well, it's been an emotional project.

TERRY MEEUWSEN: I'm sure.

And it is not so much the events of that day,

as all the family memories.

Those bring emotion.

But it was a story that needed to be told.

And because Rachel was the first one to die that day,

I am blessed not to have to go into the whole event,

and the terror and violence of that day.

You mentioned the impact of social media

on the lives of our young people today,

and I know that just the trailer for the film,

which we just saw a little bit of,

has had an interesting impact.

I mean, YouTube blocked it for awhile,

and you've had some negative commentary.

What's happening with that, and why?

Well, I think it's the enemy at work.

He has fought hard and long to keep this story

from being told.

We have faced spiritual warfare from the very beginning.

So, on set every day since we started this project

we've had intercessors.

We fasted and prayed that the Lord protect the story,

and allow us to tell it the closest to God's heart as

possible.

And there was a lot of effort made,

even when Columbine happened, to take God out of the equation,

you know?

TERRY MEEUWSEN: Of course.

That none of this happened, these kids

weren't challenged for their faith.

But the truth is, they were.

And so it's just another ploy the enemy

throws in your path to disrupt what God wants to do.

What do you want the takeaway to be for people

who see "I'm Not Ashamed"?

Well, it's kind of twofold.

I want kids to really be motivated and inspired

that they can live their life and live it well,

and God will bless them.

And that they don't have to be perfect to be used by God,

because God doesn't have any perfect people.

So you qualify if you just want to be used,

if you're willing and obedient.

And the second takeaway I want is

for parents and grandparents.

I want them to engage with their children,

find out what's going on.

And build some strongholds around their children--

spiritual strongholds-- that the enemy can't tear down and get

to them, because he works 24/7, 365,

and they are so vulnerable in this culture that we live in.

Absolutely.

Well, Beth, thank you for sharing your story.

We look forward to seeing the story and the message of "I'm

Not Ashamed."

That's the name of the film.

It's rated PG-13.

I want you to know it opens nationwide tomorrow,

so be sure to see it.

In fact, use it as an opportunity

to talk to your children about the things that really matter.

We'll be back right after this.

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