The Christian Broadcasting Network

Browse Videos

Share Email

News on The 700 Club: January 20, 2017

As seen on "The 700 Club," January 20: 100 days, 100 tasks: a look ahead at Trump's first 100 days in office; Trump administration ushers in new era of US-Israeli relations, and more. Read Transcript


Hello everyone and welcome to this special Inauguration Day

Edition of "The 700 Club".

Well, after one of the longest, most expensive and strangest

elections in American history, Donald Trump

becomes the 45th President of the United States today.

And he clearly intends to get off to a very fast start,

with new executive orders to come, possibly

as soon as today.

David Brody brings us this look at Trump's plans

for his first 100 days.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

DAVID BRODY (VOICEOVER): You could potentially

accomplish a lot in 100 days.

You could lose weight.

You could walk from New York to Los Angeles at a brisk pace,

or even write the US Constitution,

all big victories.

That's what President Trump hopes

for in his first 100 days.

I think the first couple of months for Donald Trump

is going to be very intense, because he wants wins.

He really wants points on the board.

DAVID BRODY (VOICEOVER): At "Real Clear Politics",

AB Stoddard knows what presidents face in this town.

She says Trump is about to get a dose of congressional reality.

He's going to find that it's not a boardroom

and that you have to do some care and feeding of members

of Congress, or in the end, you lose.

DAVID BRODY (VOICEOVER): While the to-do list is fairly long,

the priority of tax reform will be a complex task.

It's very, very tricky to try to take away

any of the carveouts in the tax code.

There is a constituency and a lobby for every one,

and it's been tried before.

DAVID BRODY (VOICEOVER): Trump has already

talked infrastructure improvement,

and Democrats seem willing to work with him on it.

Then, of course, there's repealing and replacing

Obamacare.

The conservatives have been waiting

for this for since 2010, will demand this.

This is year seven, and they need some kind of action

right away.

DAVID BRODY (VOICEOVER): Evangelicals want results too,

from the defunding of Planned Parenthood to Trump

fulfilling his promise to repeal the Johnson Amendment, which

muzzles pastors in the pulpit.

Free speech is being taken away

from people that are great people,

from people that are saying good things, not bad things.

DAVID BRODY (VOICEOVER): But Trump's biggest move

could happen within just weeks of taking the oath.

High profile, the Supreme Court pick.

Crucial to everything, sets the tone at the beginning,

I would think.

He's got to come out strong there.

That pick-- which is coming in two weeks after

he's inaugurated-- is going to be such an important beginning.

Many voters voted for Donald Trump with a stomachache

because they want a Supreme Court with three more

conservative justices on it, or at least one

or two, possibly three.

And that-- to many voters-- was the sole reason

for voting for Donald Trump.

DAVID BRODY (VOICEOVER): As the country waits for that name,

Trump will be busy with pen in hand.

The plan, reverse many of Obama executive actions

and end burdensome federal and environmental regulations.

The new president won't need Congress

to approve the Keystone Pipeline or leave the Trans-Pacific

Partnership trade deal that Obama put in place,

but lawmakers never approved.

Trump can also stop climate change payments

to the United Nations.

It's a lot to keep up with, so sign up for Twitter,

because that's where you're going to find the new bully

pulpit of the presidency, as the new commander in chief, Trump,

breaks new ground by going directly

to the people as Tweeter in Chief.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Well, David Brody is with us now from our Washington bureau.

David, it's good to have you with us today.

Is it Trump's basic belief?

Does he feel like he was elected to make change

and so absolutely intends for that to be the focus?

There's no question about that, Terry.

I think that has been the case.

And quite frankly, it really hadn't

been the case at the beginning of this campaign.

But as the campaign went along, he

realized he had a basket full of deplorables

that were with him all around the country.

And Terry, this was the Democrat's biggest fear.

I remember talking to a Democrat strategist

about nine months ago.

This was roughly about six months into the campaign.

And they said, look, if Donald Trump actually

becomes the GOP nominee against Hillary Clinton,

our biggest fear is that rust belt-- that means Pennsylvania,

Wisconsin-- those states those rust belt older,

white Americans who are Reagan Democrats will come out

in support of Trump because he's speaking their language.

And boy, for a brash billionaire to talk like a cab driver

and relate to folks like that, it's quite a political skill.

He has been able to do that.

And I think we're authentically going

to see that here in mere hours.

Well David, this is Pat.

And hey man, what a day.

45.

You know, David, I don't know about you,

but I think that Trump is going to be

a transformational figure.

I think he's going to go down in history as one

of the great presidents of all time.

Do you share my view or not?

Is that-- is that too over-the-top?

Well, I can confirm that he shares your view, Pat.

I don't think any question about it.

Look, I think the bottom line with Donald Trump

is he doesn't have time for all the silly nonsense that goes on

in Washington.

And I think what you're going to see

is matter of fact, the parade which normally is like three

hours, this inaugural parade.

He says, like enough with the three hour parade.

I want an hour and a half because I got to get to work.

He's going to go visit the CIA on Saturday--

or the FBI-- excuse me-- on Saturday.

It's not a weekend for Donald Trump.

So this guy has no problem here getting down

to getting make sure what's done in Washington gets done.

And I think that's the key.

As a matter of fact, I can see him now,

Pat, where he literally looks around

at all the pomp and circumstance and says,

well, this is very nice.

Very elegant, but really, let's just get to work.

David, you know, I understand that he's forecasting

cuts of $10 trillion.

I mean, this is a major, major, but it's overdue.

Yeah, we're looking at the Commerce Department, the Energy

Department.

And in essence, he's going to get rid of a lot of that waste

that we've heard for years about.

But let's face it, the establishment-- Republican

and Democrat-- have had no desire to get rid of those pork

projects or some of what that excess waste is

all around Washington.

So yes, he is going to do that.

It could be $10 trillion over 10 years.

The National Endowment for Arts.

We know about that liberal gobbledygook, if you will.

That should be gone.

He's looking at privatizing PBS, the Corporation

for Public Broadcasting.

So there are going to be a lot of changes coming

and it will happen quickly, Pat, especially as it

relates to executive orders.

Listen.

The slush fund for liberals, that National Endowment

for the Arts that Mapplethorpe, I

remember standing up against the horrible things

that that man did.

It was disgusting, obscene and nasty.

And yet, we've had to pay for it.

You remember the leaping lesbian follies?

And I said if the lesbians want to leap and folly,

they can do it on their own money, not on mine.

OK, David, it looks like Trump has

more evangelicals in his administration

than any president.

How much influence do you think they're going to have?

Huge.

Pat, this is huge.

Let's go down the list.

In the West Wing, you've got obviously, Mike Pence.

Kellyanne Conway, a born again evangelical.

Reince Priebus, an evangelical, faith very important to him.

So you've got the White House Chief of Staff, a Senior

Adviser and the Vice President all as true, true blue--

if you will-- believers.

And then you go to the cabinet and you have Ben Carson,

you have Betsy Devadasi, you have others

as well, Mike Pompeo.

And so you put all of this in totality,

you say, my goodness gracious.

What a list of characters-- if you

will-- evangelical characters.

And let's not forget Sean Spicer, a pro-life-- excuse me,

I was about call him a pro-life Democrat.

What am I talking about?

A pro-life Catholic who wears his faith actually

a bit on his sleeve too.

We had a chance to speak with Sean Spicer, Pat-- Jennifer

and I up in Trump Tower last week

in an off-the-record meeting-- and there are changes to come.

This administration, we're in tight with this administration

as it relates to being on the ground

and understanding the pulse of what's going to happen.

So keep it here.

We're going have quite a bit to share.

One last fight they've got is tax reform.

Everybody knows the code needs fixing.

The lobbyists are going to be going

for their piece of the pie.

What do you think?

Is there going to be a huge fight over it?

There's going to be a big fight over tax reform.

But there is an expectation up here in Washington

that that will get done.

So the question then becomes, Pat, what

happens in the first 100 days?

Do not expect any sort of tax reform package

to actually get signed into law by President Trump--

I can't believe I just said those words.

I said-- I said those words, Pat.

Who ever thought I would say those words-- President

Trump in the first 100 days.

Instead, I think what you'll see at the end of 100 days is

a framework for tax reform.

It is complicated, you're right.

The lobbyist will be up in arms left and right, literally left

and right.

And so when you put it all together,

the framework will be there at the end of 100 days,

but then maybe expect something in April, maybe May,

actually, as it relates to tax reform

being on the President's desk.

David, it's a new day.

There's happiness in Washington.

Anyhow, we'll talk more about it.

Thank you for covering.

Appreciate it.

You bet, thanks, Pat.

Well, there are many influential people

in Washington as the Trump Administration

comes into office.

The question is who will be the most powerful?

Our Jenna Browder brings us this look at three key Washington

insiders.

JENNA BROWDER (VOICEOVER): Three wheelers and dealers

at the center of the Trump Administration:

Vice President-elect Mike Pence, Speaker of the House,

Paul Ryan, and soon to be Chief of Staff, Reince Priebus.

What's your overall impression of each one of these men?

Well, I think that they're really in a different league.

JENNA BROWDER (VOICEOVER): Former House Speaker,

Newt Gingrich-- who knows a thing or two about Washington--

sees Pence as perhaps the most important.

He's like the moon to Trump's sun.

JENNA BROWDER (VOICEOVER): And Gingrich

thinks Pence can carry the load on Capitol Hill

by using his experience and close ties to lawmakers.

Pence will be really important in saying,

you know, this hasn't quite gone over up on the hill.

Or the hill's raised these new questions.

Or Senator Jones came by to see me

and he has this problem we need to solve.

So he becomes a gatherer of information.

That's very important on the outside.

JENNA BROWDER (VOICEOVER): His friendly relationship

with Ryan will also prove critical,

and to help smooth out any bumps between the Speaker

and new president.

Paul Ryan did not want Donald Trump in the primaries.

He made that perfectly clear.

And once Trump was the nominee and remained

a really controversial figure, doing things that Republicans

could not defend.

JENNA BROWDER (VOICEOVER): AB Stoddard,

with "Real Clear Politics" says Ryan is in an especially

tough position.

AB STODDARD: There's a big burden

on the Speaker of the House to try

to shepherd through-- first of all,

keep his ranks together, hold a united front against Democrats,

and then keep some cohesion with the president

and the executive branch to pass an agenda through in a very

polarized time without eruptions on Twitter from Donald Trump.

JENNA BROWDER (VOICEOVER): At the other end of Pennsylvania

Avenue will be Trump's right hand man and White House

Chief of Staff who's known both Pence and Ryan for decades.

In having an effective day-to-day operation,

Reince Preibus has clearly got the primary burden.

That's what he's going to focus on

is making the train run on time.

In your opinion, what's the key

to making this situation work?

NEWT GINGRICH: I think the key is open communication, having

coffee together regularly.

It's not always the business meeting

where you look each other in the eye and you're negotiating.

Sometimes, it's sitting around chatting

and letting things bubble up.

And on the flip side, what do you

think it would take to tear it all apart?

One of them tried to say that they were clever

and that they're going to somehow operate

in a deceitful way or operate by being sneaky.

I think that person wouldn't last very long.

JENNA BROWDER (VOICEOVER): All three--

here for a reason-- to get results.

In other words, to turn bills into laws.

A unique combination bringing a president

who won as an outsider, together with insider know-how,

to turn his vision of Make America Great Again

into reality.

In Washington, Jenna Browder, CBN News.

Thanks, Jenna.

Well, our correspondent Abigail Robertson

joins us now from the rooftop of 101 Constitution Avenue,

with a spectacular view of the West front of the Capitol,

where President-elect Donald Trump will soon be sworn in.

Abby, tell us about what's going on in Washington.

Oh man, it is an exciting time in Washington.

The first family arrived yesterday afternoon,

and they've started the day at Arlington Cemetery laying

wreaths, and then went to the welcome ceremony

at Lincoln Memorial, which I had the pleasure of attending.

It was a beautifully done event with lots

of performers like Three Doors Down

and country music star, Toby Keith.

It ended with great-- a spectacular fireworks display.

And then, they had a gala last night at Union Station.

And now, there are already thousands of people here ready

for the swearing in.

Well, how tight has the security been?

I know there's been some talk of a demonstration,

but how much security is in place?

I have never seen so much security in Washington before.

But I also have never seen so many protesters.

They have been in front of my apartment every night

this week.

I even had the pleasure of hearing their encore

performance at 2:00 AM last night.

But the security team is just doing a fabulous job.

I feel very, very safe.

They are everywhere all over the city.

And they really have things under control.

Well, Trump faced opposition from congressional Republicans

during the primaries.

You've talked with some key Senators, McCain, Rand Paul,

Lindsay Graham.

What did they tell you?

Well, Senator Graham and McCain will probably--

probably be two of Trump's kind of biggest GOP critics.

And both of them said that they're kind of on board

with a lot of what Trump wants to do.

Senator Graham told me he's all for Trump's tax reform,

boosting the military, and electing pro-life leaders

to the Supreme Court.

But they really disagree with his stance on Russia right now,

and want him to kind of toughen up against Russia

and increase sanctions for meddling in the November

elections.

Well, Trump was saying things like, I love Paul Ryan.

How close is the team or his Republicans in Congress?

He's working very closely with Republican leaders.

I think they all realize that they

need to take advantage of this three branch control

to really get their priorities passed into law.

So they're all trying to get on the same page

to get some bills together that they can all agree with.

One last question.

There's talk about cutting funding for the UN

because of what the UN did in relation to Israel.

Is that going to go anywhere do you think?

I think so.

When I spoke to Senator Graham, he

is in charge of foreign operations funding.

And he said that for the past year,

he has warned the UN that if they

tried to pass a resolution against Israel before Obama

and Kerry took office, that Obama and Kerry would not veto,

that he would take action.

And currently, the US funds 21% of the UN's annual budget.

So he thinks that this bill that he's proposed alongside Senator

Ted Cruz is really going to get their attention

and make them rethink this resolution.

Well, Abby, thank you.

And it must be an exciting day for you, so stay warm

and stay safe.

And we'll talk to you later, OK?

All right, I will.

EMBED THIS VIDEO

Related Podcasts


CBN.com | Do You Know Jesus? | Privacy Notice | Prayer Requests | Support CBN | Contact Us | Feedback
© 2012 Christian Broadcasting Network