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CBN NewsWatch Morning: September 17, 2018

CBN NewsWatch Morning: September 17, 2018 Read Transcript


- [Narrator] This is CBN NewsWatch.

- And thank you so much for joining us.

On today's NewsWatch, the remnants

of Hurricane Florence drench the Carolinas

with officials and weather experts warning

the effects of thestorm are far from over.

We'll have a report frominside the storm zone.

And a look at what's still ahead.

Plus, a late challenge to Brett

Kanavaugh's nomination to the US

Supreme Court.

Could it hold up thevote on his confirmation?

We'll have that story and more

on today's NewsWatch.

The aftermath of hurricane Florence

is continuing into a second week

with at least 17 dead so far and hundreds

of thousands without power.

Amber Strong takes a look at the fallout

from the slow moving storm and what

lies ahead.

- [Amber Strong] Nowa tropical depression,

the remnants of hurricaneFlorence are still

lashing the Carolinas.

- What we're dealing with is probably

the most catastrophicdisaster that this county

has seen in the last 50 or 60 years.

- [Amber] The powerfulstorm and heavy rain,

leaving more than 500,000 in the dark

and prompting hundreds of water rescues.

Like this mother and baby saved

by the Coast Guard.

- We've got you sir.

- I can't.

- No rush.

- [Amber] But inWilmington North Carolina,

firefighters prayed outside the scene

where a mother and her eight-month-old

were killed when a tree crashed

into their home Friday.

The injured father wastaken to the hospital.

Today, teams like the National Guard,

the US Marine Corp, and volunteer groups

like the Cajun Navy and the New York

Fire Department are all on the scene.

- When you can help your fellow man,

When you can get out there and do what

you're trained to do,that's a great thing.

- [Amber] North CarolinaSenator Thom Tillis

says the economic impacton the tar heel state

will be long lasting.

- The agriculture industry, the largest

industry in our state is hard hit.

We're going to have tosort out the crop damage.

- [Amber] The federalgovernment's saying the

recovery process willtake a full team effort.

It's a locally executed, state managed,

federally supported and that's the model

that we shoot for.

- [Amber] Also warningother states to beware

as the effects ofFlorence continue inland.

- We're also anticipating you're about

to see a lot of damage going through

West Virginia, all the way up to Ohio

as this system exists out.

- [Amber] PresidentTrump says he's pleased

with the comprehensive recovery response

so far, tweeting, "FEMA, first responders

"and law enforcement are working really

"hard on hurricane Florence.

"As the storm begins to finally recede,

"they will kick into an even higher gear."

- Now the president has been in touch

with local officialsthroughout the disaster,

but the White House says he will travel

to impacted areas assoon as they determine

that his travel will not disrupt

recovery efforts.

Amber Strong, CBN News.

- Flood waters are prompting emergency

situations in the Carolinas.

Tropical storm Florence continues to dump

inches of rain and the river banks

are overflowing.

So far, at least 17 people have been

killed from the storm.

Our National Security Correspondent,

Erik Rosales, is inWilmington North Carolina

and he brings us this first-hand look

at the powerful impact of the heavy

rains from Florence.

- After four straight days and nights

of pounding rain and howling wind,

we're starting to seea break in the clouds.

But, take a look at this.

This is one of the local rivers here

and look at what it's doing to Highway 40.

It's eroding the road.

And it's not the only one.

The storm is speeding up as it exists

the Carolinas, but it'sstill dumping rain.

Lots of it.

Rescue teams are out in full force,

pulling about a thousand people

from their flooded homes and shelters

are overwhelmed.

Wilmington is now cut off and officials

are planning to fly food and water

into the city of 120,000 people.

- This storm has never been more dangerous

than it is right now.

- [Erik] Neighborhoodslook like a war zone.

Roadways impassable.

Streets are a maze of fallen trees.

- The next half of the tree went.

Hit the roof, knocked the chimney

down onto my first floorden and that knocked

a hole in the roof.

- [Erik] But the worst of Mother Nature

is bringing out the best of human nature.

These men traveled from Tennessee.

Small business ownerswho say they are doing

what God wants them to do.

- It just seems likethe right thing to do.

Help people out.

They got to be able toget back to their homes.

They can't do that unless we clean it up.

- Just a need to give back.

The Lord has blessed us.

We can bless others.

- [Denny Best] I've driven around

the town a little bit.

I can see how badly we've been hit.

It's going to take a lot of people

like this coming down to help us recover.

We're ain't going to beable to do it by ourselves.

- Erik, you are literallyon an island right now.

Tell us what your situation is like.

- Well, I tell you what.

It is definitely a surreal situation

when we realize that there is no way

in and no way out.

We are actually, behindme is the Cape Fear

river and local residentstell me that all the rain

that's going to be comingfrom the mountains,

it's going to betraveling all the way down

into the other riversand then they eventually

come into the Cape Fear river.

Just to give you an idea and show

you how close our hotel is,

Mario, why don't you pan on over

and you can go ahead and see our hotel

is only about 30 yards away from the river

front and you can see thata lot of it is already

wet right now.

We've been told thatit actually could come

over the embank and go into our rooms

so we are on evacuation orders.

Preventative right now just to be watching

the river over the next couple of days.

- How long do you anticipate being stuck

in that area?

- We just don't know.

We actually spoke to the mayor

and the mayor says as of right now

he's advising none of the residents

who evacuated to come back because

there's no way in, no way out.

We're hearing possibly either Wednesday

or Thursday that we have to possibly

hope for sunshine sothat all of this water

will start to dry up.

- How are people gettingaround in that area?

- People are trying to do what they can.

The biggest thing rightnow is gas and water.

We're also hearing that a local plant

which is just up the river, it's a water

treatment plant, we arehearing that their biggest

issue right now is getting diesel.

If they do not get thediesel that they need

to be able to purify the water,

then they're going to shut down the water.

As of right now, we could be out of water

here, on Tuesday andwe're actually hearing

that the National Guardis going to be bringing

in supplies through helicopters.

Food, water, just for the residents

who are here, including us, the media

who are covering the event.

- Are we looking at serious food

shortages there right now?

- As of right now, yes.

We actually went to a number of stores,

actually a couple of stores have been

looted.

There's looting that's taking place.

Police officers have made several arrests

here in Wilmington.

Right now, the shelves are bare.

We have quite a bit offood, snacks and things

like that, that we broughtfrom the Washington DC

area so we're living on those right now.

Lots of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches

and I hate peanut butterbut it fills the tummy.

(laughing)

- Indeed it does.

Erik Rosales reportingfor us in Wilmington

North Carolina.

Erik, thank you so much.

- [Erik] You got it.

- And for a look at theremnants of Florence

and what it could do next is meteorologist

Joe Bastardi.

He is the chief forecaster for WeatherBell

Analytics.

He joins us now.

I know that we weresaying you would likely

be talking about this through Tuesday.

How much more rain can we expect

from Florence?

- I think the worst of the heavy rains

are over, certainly for the Carolinas.

The one thing that we'relucky with Florence,

even though it's going to be causing

heavy rains, it's going to cause some

flash flooding through Pennsylvania

and into southern New England here,

is that there's no extra injection

of energy from a colder source.

A lot of times, like for instance,

when Camille went absolutely wild in 1969,

in the mountains of WestVirginia and Virginia,

there was an upper airtrough of low pressure

that came into the stormindependent of the storm

and so that added some extra energy to it.

When you cool the atmosphere you increase

the condensationprocesses so you literally

squeeze the water out of the atmosphere.

There is a tremendous amount of water

with this, but, theatmosphere is not cooling

as Florence is dying out.

It continues to move north and eventually

northeast, but what it'sgoing to do is basically

rain itself out and get out of there

quick enough by tomorrow afternoon,

tomorrow night, that we're not going

to see that extra process go on.

In the general sense.

Now, there are goingto be some four or five

inch rain amounts andthe danger, of course,

is with the amount of rainwe've had this summer,

that a couple of inches of rain is going

to aggravate the situation even more.

In Pennsylvania, I know where I live,

the rivers and streamsare at bank-full already.

That's a problem but this is over the next

24 to 36 hours, I don'tthink this is the worst

case scenario for astorm raining itself out.

Even though there aregoing to be problems.

We don't want to under play the problems,

but we don't want toexaggerate the problems

either.

- Indeed.

So, Florence rains itself out.

What about the storms that are still

out in the Atlantic?

Do they pose a threat?

- As I said, we told you last week,

it's going to be a shut down of the entire

process out there for a week to 10 days.

Globally, all the tropics have collapsed

globally and I don't recall seeing a

September 17th where there are no tropical

storms anywhere on the planet.

It goes the other way.

This is what naturedoes, but we don't have

to worry about any kind of tropical

cyclone activity for the next week

effecting the United States.

I am concerned, that atthe end of September,

the first 10 days of October, we're going

to have to pay a pricethere that we're going

to see development and it's going to come

at the United States.

This is simply pattern recognition, folks.

This is natural pattern recognition.

Now one of the things is you've seen

how when a storm, when there's a storm

going on, but on August 23rd, we told

everyone, there's going to be a 10 to 15

day period coming inSeptember where everything's

going to go wild at once and we expect

storms to hit the United States.

Then it's going to shut down.

That's what you're seeing it doing.

Look, it's nothing that you cannot

see in a general sense coming because

you simply match what happened before

to what's going on now.

- Joe, I know there'sbeen a lot of political

talk around this stormabout climate change

and so on.

What's your take on that?

- It's the weaponization of weather.

I wrote a book on this last year called,

The Climate Chronicles.

It's out there if you want to Google it.

I don't mean to put in a plug for my book,

but the fact of thematter is there's several

chapters showing how this is nothing about

sciences, political.

There's a chapter in there called

The Weaponization ofWeather which is exactly

what they're doing.

Every event.

Now, let me ask you this question,

how is it Florence did not intensify

coming to the coast, it actually

weakened some, thank God, and how

is it Isaac, at the height of the season,

in the dead of thetropics down there toward

the Caribbean, just fell apart completely?

No one seems to answer those questions.

All they do is wait, theydon't tell you before.

They wait until it happens and then start

mouthing off about it and it's really

a shame that the purity and majesty

of the atmosphere, back and forth

and all this that goes on is being dragged

through a political mud field by people

who really don't have that big an interest

in weather or climate.

They're just using it for whatever purpose

they have.

- WeatherBell ChiefForecaster, Joe Bastardi,

thank you so much for being with us.

- I appreciate you havingme on and hopefully

I'll be on on a sunny day.

- That would be much better.

Thank you Joe.

- Thank you.

- CBN's Operation Blessing is bringing

immediate relief to those in need

in the wake of hurricane Florence,

providing water, food, hygiene kits

and flood buckets.

CBN's Dan Rainey brings us that story.

- [Dan Rainey] Even as flood waters

recede, more flooding may be on the way.

But Operation Blessings,already on the scene,

helping hundreds of families in the wake

of hurricane Florence.

We're here in New Bern North Carolina

where we have dozens of volunteers

that have been handing out an entire

truck load of emergency supplies.

Food, hygiene kits, water, and these flood

buckets so people can start the clean

up process.

We are meeting people's immediate needs.

Meanwhile, a second teamfrom Operation Blessing

is scouting locationssouth of Raleigh to find

out where Operation Blessingcan do the most good.

- Operation Blessing is here in Lumberton

North Carolina to reach the residents

that have not gottenhelp from anyone else.

Behind me you see Chippewa Street,

which has been completely flooded.

We're really close to the river.

Along with these streets, a lot of homes

have been flooded.

We are meeting with local church leaders

to see how Operation Blessing can bring

some relief to these home owners.

- [Dan] For the time being most people

are staying in shelters.

They need the basics and they're happy

to get them.

- I appreciate y'all CBN.

Y'all the best.

- [CBN Member] Thank you.

- Y'all stay strong.

God bless you.

- [Dan] Deidre's house was one

of the few in her neighborhood

that didn't get flooded.

So she was among the first to volunteer

with Operation Blessing.

- Operation Blessing has been just that.

A blessing.

To see you guys come inand to see the trucks

roll up and to see thesmile on everybody's faces,

knowing that help ishere, it's been amazing.

- [Dan] With the help ofvolunteers and Operation

Blessing donors we'll continue to reach

out to families in their time of need.

- Thank you, Operation Blessing.

- [Operation BlessingMember] Yeah, amen, amen.

- Operation Blessinghard at work and to learn

more what OperationBlessing is doing there

and around the world,you can visit, OB.org.

- [Narrator] Coming up, a late accusation

against President Trump'sSupreme Court nominee,

Brett Kavanaugh, hasraised the possibility

his confirmation vote may be delayed.

We've got that story and a look at other

major stories makingheadlines when we come back.

- Welcome back.

As Florence continues its onslaught across

the Carolinas, here's a look now at some

of the other majorheadlines we're following

for you today in the CBN newsroom.

- [Narrator] Judge BrettKavanaugh's confirmation

for the Supreme Court istaking an uncertain turn.

A California professorclaims the justice nominee

sexually assaulted herat a high school party.

The woman shared her story confidentially

with the CaliforniaSenator, Dianne Feinstein.

She forwarded it to the FBI last week

but the details were later leaked.

Kavanaugh has denied the allegations.

Sixty-five women who knew Kavanaugh

in high school havedefended his character.

Some Republicans believethe move is a ploy

by Democrats to delay the vote.

Secretary of State MikePompeo is criticizing

his Obama era predecessor, John Kerry

for meeting with Iranian officials.

Kerry told Fox News last week he met

with Iran's foreign minister three or four

times since the end of his term in 2016.

Pompeo called the move inappropriate

and an active undermining of the Trump

administration's policy toward Tehran.

The president withdrewthe US from the nuclear

deal, which Kerry organized in 2015.

Crews in Hong Kong are now clearing fallen

trees and other wreckage left behind

by the world's strongest storm.

Typhoon Mangkhut reached mainland China

Sunday, killing two people.

That's after the storm hit the Philippines

leaving 54 others dead.

Hundreds of rescueworkers in the Philippines

are scrambling to find those missing.

Dozens are believed to be buried alive.

- Up next, an American-Israeli citizen

considered a champion of the Jewish

cause is murdered inIsrael by a Palestinian

teenager.

We've got a look at the brutal murder

and how Israelis andAmericans are remembering

him.

That story is coming up.

Right after this.

- Sunday, a Palestinian teenager murdered

an American-Israeli citizen,Ari Fuld in the area

of Gush Etzion in the Judea, also known

as the West Bank.

As Julie Stahl reports now from Jerusalem,

many saw Fuld as a champion of the Jewish

cause in the promised land.

(singing)

- [Julie Stahl] Thousandsgathered to mourn

a man many Jews considered a hero.

- I think that his message was the love

of Israel and not the hate of the other.

Of the Arabs.

- [Julie] US Ambassador, David Friedman,

attended the funeral and tweeted,

"American grieves as one of its citizens

"was brutally murdered by a Palestinian

"terrorist.

"Ari Fuld was a passionate defender of

"Israel and an American patriot.

"He represented the best of both countries

"and will be deeply missed."

Seventeen-year-old Khalil Jabarin,

stabbed Fuld in the back outside this mall

in Gush Etzion.

Even though he was wounded, Fuld managed

to chase his attacker, shoot at him,

jumped over the wall behind me before

he collapsed.

Fuld served as the DeputyDirector of Standing

Together, an organizationthat supports IDF

Soldiers.

He also hosted a talk show on Middle East

television.

Gush Etzion Mayor,Shlomo Ne'eman, told CBN

news, "It's inconceivable that a person

"wakes up in the morning with the thought

"of just killing any Jew."

- [Shlomo Ne'eman translator]There's a war here.

Everyone here is a soldier in this war.

It could be every child,every elderly person.

Every woman.

And we will win this war.

Terror won't help them.

We're here to stay forever.

- [Julie] Local residentslamented his loss.

- I know that he believedin the people of Israel.

He believed in the state of Israel

and the land of Israel.

He was a great defender of that and media,

and social media andwilling to speak about

his truth to anybody who would listen

in a way that wasn't just shout louder

than the other person.

It was a way to present a clear, positive

message of who we are and why we're here.

- [Julie] Fuld said hewas living the dream

in the land of Israel and loved the nation

of Israel, it's land and the Torah.

Thousands followed Fuld'sviews on his Facebook

page.

- Hey everyone.

Ari Fuld here.

We're broadcasting outof the beautiful rolling

hills of Judeah Israel.

- [Julie] Fuld is survived by his wife

and four children.

Julie Stahl, CBN news, Gush Etzion Judea.

- And we'll be backwith more CBN NewsWatch

right after this.

(light music)

It is time for your Monday motivation

and I leave you with this thought,

"Be careful not to allow the blessing

"you prayed for to become a burden

"you no longer appreciate."

God answered your prayer but it's real

easy to allow that blessing to become

normal and routine.

With that word, I encourage you

to make this a marvelous Monday

and a wonderful rest of the week.

That is going to do it for this half-hour

of CBN NewsWatch.

Remember you can findmore of our exclusive

coverage of the issues you care most about

at cbnnews.com.

We'd love to hear what you think

about the stories you've seen here

today.

You can do that byemailing newswatch@CBN.com.

You can also reach outand touch us on Facebook,

Twitter and Instagram.

Hope you'll join us again, right here,

next time.

Make it a marvelous Monday.

We'll see you tomorrow.

(light music)

- [Narrator] This is CBN NewsWatch.

- And thank you for joiningus for this half hour

of CBN NewsWatch.

I'm Efrem Graham.

Coming up, we'll havea look at the forecast

for what's ahead for the ongoing rainfall

from the remains of hurricane Florence,

plus, if you live in the country side

of America, you may have a hard time

finding a doctor.

We're going to show you what one county

is doing to help healthe shortage of rural

doctors.

And Anne Graham Lotz brings us a personal

look at her memories of her father,

Billy Graham.

The aftermath of hurricaneFlorence is continuing

into a second week with at least 17 dead

so far and hundreds ofthousands without power.

Amber Strong takes a look at the fallout

from the slow movingstorm and what lies ahead.

- [Amber Strong] Nowa tropical depression,

the remnants of hurricane Florence

are still lashing the Carolinas.

- What we're dealing with is probably

the most catastrophic disaster

that this county has seen in the last

50 or 60 years.

- [Amber] The powerfulstorm and heavy rain

leaving more than 500,000 in the dark

and prompting hundreds of water rescues

like this mother and baby saved

by the Coast Guard.

- We've got you sir.

- I can't.

- No rush.

- [Amber] But, inWilmington North Carolina

firefighters prayed outside the scene

where a mother and her eight-month-old

were killed when a tree crashed

into their home Friday.

The injured father wastaken to the hospital.

Today, teams like theNational Guard, the US

Marine Corp, and volunteer groups like

the Cajun Navy and theNew York Fire Department

are all on the scene.

- When you can help your fellow man,

when you can get out there and do what

you're trained to do,that's a great thing.

- [Amber] North CarolinaSenator Thom Tillis

says the economic impacton the tar heel state

will be long lasting.

- The agriculture industry, the largest

industry in our state, is hard hit.

We're going to have tosort out the crop damage.

- [Amber] The federal government's saying

the recovery process will take a full team

effort.

- It's a locally executed, state managed,

federally supported and that's the model

that we shoot for.

- [Amber] Also warning other states

to beware as the effects of Florence

continue inland.

- We're also anticipating you're about

to see a lot of damage going through

West Virginia, all the way up to Ohio

as this system exists out.

- [Amber] PresidentTrump says he's pleased

with the comprehensive recovery response

so far.

Tweeting, "FEMA, first responders, and law

"enforcement are working really hard

"on hurricane Florence.

"As the storm begins to finally recede,

"they will kick into an even higher gear."

- Now the president has been in touch

with local officialsthroughout the disaster

and the White House says he will travel

to impacted areas assoon as they determine

that his travel will notdisrupt recovery efforts.

Amber Strong, CBN news.

- Amber, thank you.

So, what is the likely path ahead

for Florence?

For a look at the forecast for the days

ahead, here's a reportnow from AccuWeather.

- Florence continues to weaken as it spins

its way up through theAppalachians on this

Monday and still some pockets of heavy

rain and also some pockets of severe

weather, so we're not done with the rain

and the potential for tornadoes quite yet.

Rainfall though, quite amazing here

from Florence.

We've had record setting rains.

Look at these amounts, totalling almost

three feet in Swansboro and about two

feet of rain down theNorth Carolina coast.

These are the heaviest of precipitation

amounts that we could find, but we did see

widespread one to twofeet of rain all the way

from eastern North Carolina down into the

southeastern portions of the state.

Looking at SouthCarolina, very heavy rains

in the northeast part of the state.

You can see the tallies here,

anywhere from a foot to almost a foot

and a half of rain.

Of course, that lead to widespread

flooding and road closures.

And the rivers, they're all swollen here.

Look at all the rivershere from South Carolina

to North Carolina in either a moderate

or a major flood stage and these flood

waters will stay high for the next couple

of weeks.

Evacuations will continue.

We'll have more road closures in the area

and that's so much water, look at that.

Some record river crests.

All that water's headed right down

to the coast.

Let's take a look back at some of the wind

gusts too.

Highest winds in North Carolina,

look at that.

A hundred to a hundredtwelve miles an hour here,

right along the coast and just offshore.

We did see those destructive winds down

in South Carolina too.

Here are the more significant winds

anywhere from 40 to over 60 miles an hour

there, at Myrtle Beach.

Rainfall, still dealing with that.

But it's tapering off in the Carolinas.

Rain advances north and then it turns

east, where its the floodwatches are in effect

for several more inches of rain.

Here's our future cast for rainfall across

the Carolinas.

Notice some dry comingup from the southwest.

Rain not as extreme as what we've seen.

Still a few pockets of heavy downpours.

Main thrust the rain up the Appalachians

and then turning acrossthe New England states

on Tuesday.

Here we can see three or more inches,

then flooding and still the risk for a few

rotating storms today.

- As Florence continues its onslaught

across the Carolinas, here now is a look

at some of the other major headlines

we're following for you in the CBN

newsroom today.

- [Narrator] Judge Brett Kavanaugh's

confirmation for theSupreme Court is taking

an uncertain turn.

A California professor claims the justice

nominee sexually assaultedher at a high school

party.

The woman shared her story confidentially

with California Senator Dianne Feinstein.

Dianne Feinstein forwarded it to the FBI

last week but the detailswere later leaked.

Kavanaugh has denied allegations.

Sixty-five women whoknew Kavanaugh in high

school have defended his character.

Some Republicans believethe move is a ploy

by Democrats to delay the vote.

Secretary of State, MikePompeo was criticizing

his Obama era predecessor, John Kerry,

for meeting with Iranian officials.

Kerry told Fox News last week he met

with Iran's foreign minister three or four

times since the end of his term in 2017.

Pompeo called the move inappropriate

and an active undermining of the Trump

administration's policy toward Tehran.

The president withdrewthe US from the nuclear

deal which Kerry organized in 2015.

Crews in Hong Kong are now clearing

fallen trees and other wreckage left

behind by the world's strongest storm.

Typhoon Mangkhut reached mainland China

Sunday, killing two people.

That's after the storm hit the Philippines

leaving 54 others dead.

Hundreds of rescueworkers in the Philippines

are scrambling to find those missing.

Dozens are believed to be buried alive.

- [Narrator] Up next, youmay enjoy the open spaces

if you live in the countryside outside

of the city, but it mayalso mean it is hard

for you to find a doctor because there

just aren't enough ofthem in rural America.

We're going to explainwhy and what's being

done about it when we come back.

(light music)

- Living in the countrysidehas its advantages

but not if you need a doctor.

Some 90 million Americans can't count

on adequate medical carebecause there aren't

enough doctors where they live.

That's because physiciansare living and working

closer to cities.

One California county is undertaking

a unique plan to attract more doctors.

As Lorie Johnson showsus, if it's successful,

it could serve as a modelfor other communities.

- [Lorie Johnson] Compared to patients in

big cities, a diagnosisof cancer, heart disease,

diabetes and otherillnesses can be much worse

for folks living in rural communities.

Largely because of doctor shortages there.

New doctors tend tolocate near the medical

school where theycompleted their residency,

the years after getting their MD,

when they train in their chosen field.

Medical schools are usually located in big

cities.

That's not the case in Riverside County

California, thanks to a community-based

medical school.

The University of California Riverside

answered prayers when it opened five years

ago because the shortage of doctors

forced people to either go without medical

care or drive all the wayto Los Angeles for it.

- There are some very real health risks.

If you're having astroke, you don't actually

want to be 90 minutesaway from your primary

source of health care.

- [Lorie] That's whythe med school's primary

purpose is to plant doctors in underserved

Riverside County.

The dean believes its new crop of 110

residents will go along way towards meeting

that goal.

- Where you finish thattends to be predictive

of where you will establish your practice

and then subsequently be a practicing

physician.

- [Lorie] In addition to location,

money is a strong factor in deciding

where to put down roots.

Many new doctors feel the need to land

high paying jobs to pay off their crushing

student loan debt whichoften tops $200,000.

They find higher salaries in big cities.

UC Riverside eliminatesthat burden by offering

free tuition to med students who stay

in the area aftercompleting their training.

- As of right now I'm 100% committed

to staying here.

I'd like, ideally, to go to residency here

and then once graduating from residency,

stay within this area.

- [Lorie] After growing up in Riverside

County, Madeline knowsall too well the pain

of not having access to medical care.

- I really connect witha lot of this community.

A lot of them are homeless or struggling

below poverty line, have on and off health

insurance which are all things I've

encountered when I was younger.

- [Lorie] Unlike many medical schools,

UC Riverside doesn't bother with a big,

expensive teaching hospital.

Residents here train at smaller healthcare

facilities scattered across the county.

Obstetrics resident, Dr. Trina Mansour

already sees her presence here making

a difference.

- There's patients thathave had no prenatal

care and they come infor delivery and we have

no idea what their medical background is,

if they've ever had surgery before,

if the baby has any anomalies.

- [Lorie] Research shows most doctors

would like to set up shop near family

if possible.

UCR meds admission process takes advantage

of that desire.

- Recruiting fromstudents from this region

is an absolutely centralpillar to what we're doing.

- [Lorie] Doctor Douglas Grover,

a Riverside native, graduated from UCR

med last year.

- After my residency training,

I plan to stay in the area and give

back to the community where I grew up.

- [Lorie] As a resident in psychiatry,

he feels good aboutproviding mental health

services here.

- Things at home, families,broken relationships

that really effect the younger kids

and at times they don't have anybody

to go to talk to about it.

- [Lorie] Another big difference at UC

Riverside, students start seeing patients

in year one rather than waiting until

their third year.

These students even opened a free clinic

for folks who otherwise might not have

ever seen a doctor.

- Every time I hear that, my heart warms

a little bit because it's just one person

that we're able to help a little more that

hadn't had the help previously.

- [Lorie] While medical care disappears

in many rural areas, Riverside County

may have discovered the antidote.

Open a medical school, admit locals

with the heart for the underserved and pay

for their education provided they don't

take their talents elsewhere.

Lorie Johnson, CBN news.

- [Narrator] Coming up, the church lost

a giant earlier thisyear when Billy Graham

died.

We're going to hear from his daughter,

Anne Graham Lotz about her father's legacy

and her hope for thefuture when we come back.

Stay with us.

- Anne Graham Lotz, thedaughter of evangelist

Billy Graham recentlyannounced she has been

diagnosed with breast cancer.

Lotz suffered a personal loss

and the Christian world lost a giant

when her father died earlier this year.

For her, Billy wasn't just a public

figure who delivered fiery sermons from

countless pulpits, he was a loving father

and a family man.

CBN's Scott Ross talked with Anne about

her father's legacy and our hope for

future generations.

- Not only are our sins forgiven,

not only does he give us eternal life,

but we enter into a covenant relationship

with God.

- [Scott Ross] With a style strikingly

reminiscent of her famous father,

Anne Graham Lotz has powerfully proclaimed

the gospel for 30 years.

On the personal side, Anne is called mom

by three grown childrenand grandmother by three

young ladies.

In 2015 her belovedhusband of nearly 50 years,

Danny, died unexpectedly.

These days, Anne continues to spur

audiences around the globe to deeper

devotion to Christ.

Her newest book is The Daniel Key.

Big word, sin.

We don't hear sin much any more.

I don't know if you hear it preached,

I don't see it in the newspaper very often

and with sin comes a word that is related

to that; repentance.

You say, "Repent of my repentance."

What does repent of my repentance mean?

- I think sometimes our repentance,

what we think of asrepentance, is just remorse.

We sin, we do somethingwrong, we get caught

in it or the choice turns out to be not

to our benefit and so wesay, "God, we're sorry,"

and we feel sorry for ourselves.

We are not taking it deep and turning

away from our sin.

Biblical repentance is repudiation of sin.

It's crucifying the sin.

It's putting the sin out.

It's turning away from it completely

and I think sometimes our repentance

is so shallow that given another chance,

we'll go right back anddoing the same thing

which is not real repentance.

I guess repent, a fake repentance.

- You would be in what I consider a

baby boomer category and you have

the millennials, youhave the X generation,

et cetera, et cetera and then you look

at the condition of the country, whatever

else, are we not passingthe word on like a baton

as you describe it?

- I think some of us are,but I think the culture

has become so secularizedand almost practical

atheists where they liveand move and have their

being as though there's no God at all.

I think that's probablythe majority in our

culture and the majority in our nation,

but there are thosewho are seeking to live

faithfully, to pass iton to their children

and their grandchildren faithfully.

I've met millennials and generation Xers

and people like that whoare totally committed

to the Lord.

In fact, I think some in those generations

they almost pay a higher price because

they're so alone, but they're strong

in faith and seeking to really make

a difference.

God has a remnant in every generation,

doesn't he?

- [Scott] Yes, he does.

- So it will never bea complete generation

until Jesus comes back and sets up

his millennial reign.

I believe my father'shome going was a wake

up call.

It was a shot across the bough and Jesus

is saying, "I'm coming,it's time to get right

"with me."

- Was he disappointed,from the 1940s up through

all the years that he preached the gospel,

throughout the world,more than any individual.

To my knowledge.

Was he disappointedabout the way things have

been going in America or in the world?

- I don't want to put words in his mouth.

I think you would wishit had made a greater

difference corporately.

It's made a tremendousdifference in individual

lives, I mean, I meetthem all over the world.

Their lives were radically changed when

they went forward atdaddy's meeting or watched

him on television andthey're now in ministry.

They're now missionaries,pastors, leaders,

or parents leading their children.

I've seen that.

The impact on our nation,you know, something's

missing isn't it?

So, it may go back towhere you were talking

about passing a batonwhere somewhere Christian

parents have not passedon the truth that leads

to faith to their children.

Maybe we left it up to the churches

or to the professionals and we didn't

do it ourselves.

Something is disconnected because instead

of the nation getting better, we've gotten

worse, we've gotten farther away

from God's word.

It could be that inresponse to what my father

did, then the enemy, talk about spiritual

warfare, he's just come in like a flood

to try to undo any impact from my father's

ministry or other people's ministries

or the church, but we know in the end

that we'll be triumphant.

- The immediate future,what are you projecting?

What are you seeing?

What are you hearing?

You're encouraged, you have hope because

God's in charge of it.

- That's right.

- But the way we're going at the moment,

what do you think?

- Part of me is encouraged because I think

the leadership of thispresident and I know

we have issues with the way he expresses

himself, but his policies have been

stunningly supportive of biblical values.

Right now he has myapplause and my prayers.

I can tell you.

And because I thinkhe's in a very dangerous

place, you can feel theenemy trying to tear

him to shreds includinghis policies that have

taken a stand on biblical values.

- Have we lost our fear of God?

- Yes.

We have.

Within the church and outside the church.

It's stunning.

- Yeah.

- We live our lives asthough he's not holy,

as though he's notalmighty, as though he's

not pure, and fear of God is just that.

It's being afraid ofGod in a healthy sense.

So that that keeps us from sin.

It keeps us right before him.

Just like my father, I was, in a sense,

as a girl growing up, afraid of my father.

I wouldn't have doneanything to displease him.

You don't want to provoke his wrath.

Now my father, I think he spanked me twice

in all my life because my mother did all

the spankings.

(laughs)

But I had a healthy fear that was rooted

in my overwhelming love for my father.

I wouldn't have wanted to hurt him

or disappoint him or make him cross.

A fear of God is rooted in love for God.

But you don't want to hurt him, you don't

want to displease him and then there's

a reverence.

God is God and we are we and that's

a big difference.

- Book of Acts, fear the Lord came upon

the whole church.

- [Anne] Yeah. Yeah.

- That would be healthy.

- It would be healthy and that's where

wisdom is found.

The beginning of wisdom is fear of God,

so, we have all this technology.

All this brain power.

All of this knowledgeand we do the dumbest

things because there's no wisdom.

If you don't have fearof God, then there's

no wisdom.

- Continued prayer for Anne Graham Lotz.

We'll have much more ofCBN NewsWatch coming up.

When we come back.

(light music)

- Time now for your Monday motivation

and I leave you withthis today, "God's love

"chased you all the wayto the cross at Calvary.

"Jesus died to restore a divine

"relationship between God and man."

Think about that for just a moment.

What an amazing love God has for us all.

With that truth, I encourage you to make

this a marvelous Monday and a wonderful

rest of the week.

That is going to do it for this edition

of CBN NewsWatch.

Remember, you can findmore of our exclusive

coverage of the issues you care most about

at cbnnews.com.

We'd love to hear what you think about

the stories you've seen here today.

You can do that byemailing newswatch@CBN.com

and of course you cantalk to us on Facebook,

Twitter, as well as Instagram.

Hope you'll join us again right here,

next time.

Goodbye everybody and God bless.

(dramatic music)

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