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Christian World News - February 8, 2019

Christian World News - February 8, 2019 Read Transcript


- This week on Christian World News,

an explosive growth of Christianity

in a country where 99% ofthe population is Muslim.

Plus, they grow up on the streets

fighting off witch doctorsand sexual predators.

Meet the woman who's coming totheir rescue, body and soul.

And Uncle Tom's Cabin helpedspark America's Civil War

and led to freedom for millions of slaves.

Learn about the faithand courage of the man

that book is based on.

(dramatic music)

Hello everyone.

Welcome to this week's editionof Christian World News.

I'm George Thomas.

My colleague, WendyGriffith, is on assignment.

It's an area that was oncehostile to the gospel,

but now an amazing revival is moving

through the northernmostreaches of Africa,

and tens of thousands ofMuslims are turning to Christ.

Watch.

(Middle Eastern music)

These images of North Africans worshiping

have never been seen before on television.

As the sun sets overthe Mediterranean Sea,

Muslims across this part of Africa

are converting to faith inJesus Christ in record numbers.

- What God is doing in North Africa

all the way from actuallyMauritania to Libya

is unprecedented in thehistory of missions.

- [George] Tino Qahoush, agraduate of Regent University,

has spent years traveling the region

to document the transformation.

- I have the privilegeof recording testimonies

and listen to firsthand storiesof men and women, all ages,

where they can be sitting ina room and see the appearance,

the presence of Godappear to them in reality.

It's like a vision.

Some of them gave me storiesof they carry a conversation.

It's not just a light that appears.

- [George] His interviews confirm

what experts say is a profound move of God

in the predominantly Muslimnations of Mauritania,

Western Sahara, Morocco,Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia.

- Sometimes I feel jealous.

How come he's visiting the Muslim world

at this time and age wherewe don't hear that happening

in the traditional Christian community.

- From the shores of Casablanca in Morocco

to Tripoli, Libya, experts saythe growth of Christianity,

especially in the last 20years, has been unprecedented.

(singing in foreign language)

And nowhere is that growth more evident

than in the North Africannation of Algeria.

- [George] Pastor Salah leadsone of the largest churches

in Algeria, where 99% ofthe population is Muslim.

He says every new Christian in his church

came from a Muslim background.

Some 1,200 believers attend the church.

- [George] Men like Zino, who was invited

to attend Pastor Salah'schurch by a friend.

- [George] Others like Farhat

speak of miraculous encounters.

He says he was illiterateand couldn't read the Bible

when he accepted the Lord,then God made a change.

- [George] Even though Algeriais overwhelmingly Muslim,

the government has givenProtestant churches the freedom

to register their congregations.

- It is the first Muslim Arab government

who recognized, officially,churches from Islam.

- [George] Youssef Qurahmaneis a leading Algerian pastor.

He says the government willharass and intimidate Christians

from time to time, butthe level of persecution

is nothing like it was 20 years ago.

- God has given to us manyopportunities to witness

at the police stations, at the courts,

and actually, once I wentto the police station

and they gave me 45 minutesto speak about Jesus

Just imagine yourself,they are all Muslims

saying tell us about Jesus, please.

- [George] But Algeria andthe countries of North Africa

weren't always open to the gospel.

Peter is a veteranmissionary in these parts.

- You know there's that parable,

the sower went out to sow andthe seed fell on stony ground.

This is North Africa,in those days was quite

resistant and stony.

- [George] For securityreasons, we've altered his voice

and concealed his identity.

- The religion and theculture were unsympathetic

to anything that was foreign

and Christianity was considered

to be a religion of the Europeans.

- [George] Peter believesthe arrival of satellite TV

and the internet have dramatically

changed people'sperception of Christianity.

- Today in North Africa or on TV,

you can hear native Arab Christians

talking about their faith,who are mature Christians,

answering questions, involved in debates.

- [George] Emboldened by God's power,

Algerian Christians are now on a mission

to take the gospel to thefour corners of the globe.

- God has put in our heart

to be able to send 1,000missionaries by the year 2025,

and I really believe, maybe one day,

America will end up with someMuslim converts missionaries

coming to reach out to the Muslims there

and other parts as well.

- [George] Up next, thehorror of Haiti's street kids.

Alone and abused, theystruggle to survive.

How this woman listens to their stories

and heals their hurts.

(dramatic music)

- [Announcer] CBN presentsThe I Wills of God:

Your Path to Overcoming Fear and Anxiety.

- We're going to talk aboutsome of the incredible promises

God has made to his children.

- [Announcer] In PatRobertson's newest teaching,

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- What I felt was loved and treasured.

- God spared my life twice in three days.

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Your Path to Overcoming Fear and Anxiety.

- Hello, I'm Terry Meeuwsen.

Did you know there are morethan 148 million orphans

in the world today?

148 million.

But it was three little girls

that taught me aboutthe plight of orphans.

My husband and I spent nearly a month

immersed in the daily activitiesof a Ukrainian orphanage

as we waited to adopt three sisters.

I saw firsthand the utterloneliness, the pain of rejection,

and the overwhelming desire to be loved.

That experience changedme forever, and out of it

grew a ministry from my heartcalled Orphan's Promise.

Today, we're helping orphansand vulnerable children

in more than 50 countries worldwide.

Thousands of childrenare now in safe homes,

they're being educated, andthey're learning life skills.

I'm asking you to join with me

and become family to these children.

Will you call the numberon your screen right now?

Because every child deservesa chance to be happy.

- Life on the streetsanywhere is dangerous,

especially for a child.

In Haiti, it's deadly.

Caitlin Burke traveledto the island nation

to see how one woman isproviding a safe haven

for the street children of Cap-Haitien.

She is not only theremeeting the physical needs,

but spiritual needs as well.

(speaking foreign language)

- [Caitlin] Each morning,Linsey Jorgenson wonders

if the street children of Cap-Hatien

will choose the refuge she offers

or try to survive on their own.

- The first thing I do is pray

because you need God tobe able to do this job.

- Linsey is the founder of Streethearts,

an organization born from a bond

with the kids who captured her heart.

The streets of Haiti areno place for a child,

but because of poverty,abusive situations,

or simply having no family,

that's where many of them end up.

- They're forced into adulthood

at five, six, seven years old,

and the longer they're on the street,

the harder it is toreverse their mentality

or to come in and try to help guide them

because, at that point,they've already been so wronged

that they feel like they know everything

and everybody's against them.

- [Caitlin] Linsey first connected

with the street children of Haiti in 2012.

She would literally run across them

on her daily jogs along the boulevard.

She soon discovered theyshared something in common.

- It was kind of likeI definitely stuck out

and I was the odd person in town,

and they are also, in their way,

the odd ones left outin their communities.

They didn't have anyone,I didn't have anyone,

and we just started hanging out.

(speaking foreign language)

- [Caitlin] By earning theirtrust, she heard their stories.

(speaking foreign language)

- [Translator] I was sixwhen I was in the street.

I had a friend named Zama andhe was on the streets with me

and I was in the streetwith my friend, Zama,

and some of the street guys came

and wanted to cut us with a blade.

Everywhere I went to go to sleep,

they came and followedus with that razor blade.

(speaking foreign language)

- [Translator] Guysused to come and beat us

and take money from us,

money we collected begging in the street.

- Heavy sexual abuse,

kids as young as seven engaged

in sexual acts with men for food.

- [Caitlin] That's whyLinsey started Streethearts.

Her mission, create a safe haven

for boys living on the streets of Haiti.

The ministry recently realizedit had an even bigger calling

due to an increase in street violence.

- [Linsey] One thing we have seen recently

is child sacrifice, and thatis due to the voodoo here

that a voodoo doctor wouldcome and, for whatever reason,

someone would pay to steal a child's soul.

So then they kill the child,

they basically stone him to death,

and then they take the soul of the child.

Oftentimes, they'll taketheir teeth or something

and then they do a spell and that soul

gives whoever that wantsit power and influence.

- [Caitlin] That evil led Streethearts

to offer what's called Phase One.

Kids who aren't ready tofully leave the streets

can catch a tap tap, or Haitian taxi,

that will take them tothe Streethearts shelter.

They receive a meal, shower,and clean bed for the night.

Then they officially join the program

and move into a bigger shelter.

A Streetheart team works with each boy

teaching responsibility,discipline, and respect.

Most importantly, theylearn they are somebody

and they're loved.

- [Translator] We serveas father figures to them

and we use that as medicaltreatment in their lives.

- Patience, love, morepatience, and some more love.

You just gotta be patient with them.

Most likely, they'll come along.

- [Caitlin] Linsey feels a daily struggle

between the weight of her workand the normalcy of it all.

- You never know what's gonna happen.

You don't know if achild's gonna die that day,

who's gonna be sick,and then on top of that,

you're dealing with basicallythe day-to-day mom stuff,

which is school, soccer practice,this one's got this issue,

one kid wants you to see his art project,

running errands everywhere.

And it's not two children, it's 75.

- [Caitlin] Phase Threehelps those over 18

focus on workforce development.

The Streethearts team finds partners

to take on the kids as interns.

The progress can be slow.

Transforming a hardened adultin the body of a six-year-old

back into a child takes time.

- It's imperative thatyou take a step back

from time to time to just look at them

and see how far they've come,

whether it's in theirmannerisms, the way they dress,

how they represent themselves,getting report cards.

One of our most troubled kids

is the president of his entire school.

- [Caitlin] Jorgensonsays that, above all,

her hope for these children isthat she will them in heaven.

- That is so important for me.

When I die, and I praythat I die before them.

I cannot see one more kid die.

I want to just sit at the gate

and wait and watch them all come in.

- And so she presses on,relentlessly seeking the boys

she hasn't yet been able to reach.

The kids know that everynight the tap tap will come,

but it's still up to themwhether they accept the help

or stay on the streets.

Caitlin Burke, CBNNews, Cap-Hatien, Haiti.

- [George] Coming up, he's the model

for one of the most inspiringpieces of American literature.

The Christian man who escaped slavery

and set an example for the nation.

(dramatic music)

- [Announcer] Parents,the Superbook Bible App

is a great way to get yourchild reading the Bible.

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- [Dad] Did you win?

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(light music)

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(light music)

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- [Announcer] Discover The I Wills of God.

I will rescue him,protect him, answer him,

be with him in trouble,deliver him, honor him,

satisfy him with long life,show him my salvation.

- What I felt was loved and treasured.

- God spared my life twice in three days.

- The good Lord hadgiven me a second chance.

- [Announcer] Call1-800-700-7000 or visit CBN.com.

The I Wills of God, the latestteaching from Pat Robertson.

- The character of UncleTom has become known

as a racist stereotypehere in the United States,

but the primary inspiration forthe book, Uncle Tom's Cabin,

lived an extraordinary life.

John Jessup tells us why.

- [John] When Uncle Tom'sCabin was published in 1852,

the anti-slavery novelflew off the shelves.

17 printing presses ran 24 hours a day

to keep up with the demand,

making it the bestsellingnovel of the 19th century.

- The book struck atour emotions as a nation

and it made us see ourselves.

It was our emotional mirror

and it prompted someindividuals to rethink

how they thought of slavery.

- [John] Uncle Tom's Cabin has been cited

as a factor leading to the Civil War.

When Abraham Lincoln later met the author,

Harriet Beecher Stowe, he reportedly said,

"So you're the little woman

"who wrote the book thatstarted this great war."

In 1852, the backlash wasimmediate and powerful.

- In the South, the book was banned,

and if you were caught selling the book,

you were either going to bekilled or thrown in prison.

There was tremendous fear

that this book would make a difference.

- [John] It did by portraying Uncle Tom

as a dignified, intelligent,God-fearing man.

In the South, however, travelingTom shows became popular,

depicting him as a submissive buffoon,

happy in his enslaved condition,

a stereotype that still exists today.

There were also attempts todiscredit Harriet Beecher Stowe.

The author countered withA Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin,

an exhaustive bibliographyof the real people

behind her fictional characters.

It included her primaryinspiration for Uncle Tom.

- Josiah Henson was an individual

who demonstrated extraordinary courage.

He tried to help other people,

especially whites in this country,

to understand the reality of slavery.

- Josiah Henson's story beginshere in Rockville, Maryland,

on the outskirts of Washington, DC.

Now this suburban neighborhood

was once a 570-acre plantation.

And the house behind meis where the owner lived,

a man named Isaac Riley.

- In this time period,

masters wanted to presentthemselves to be very benevolent,

these patriarchs whocared about their people

that were enslaved, but the presentation

that Henson gives us was thatdidn't happen for Isaac Riley.

- [Josiah] I faithfullyserved Riley for many years.

He was coarse and vulgar in his habits,

and unprincipled and cruelin his general deportment.

- [John] Henson's autobiography

provides many examples of Riley's cruelty,

like the day he discovereda book on grammar

hidden in nine-year-old Josiah's cap.

- When Riley saw the bookof course he was outraged

because it was unheard ofthat his enslaved people

would learn to read and write.

- [Josiah] "Pick up that book," he cried,

using an awful oath.

At last, I was obliged to do it,

when he beat me across the head and back

till my eyes were swollenand I became unconscious.

- [John] Despite the harsh treatment,

Henson proved to be trustworthy.

Eventually elevated tooverseeing the plantation,

he was able to ease the harsh conditions

faced by his fellow slaves.

When he was 18, he as even allowed

to attend a revival meeting.

Although not permittedto enter the church,

he heard a life changing message

from preacher John McKenny.

- [Josiah] He said, "JesusChrist, the Son of God,

"tasted death for every man."

It touched my heart, and I cried out,

"I wonder if Jesus Christ died for me."

Again and again did thepreacher reiterate the words

for every man.

Oh, the blessedness and sweetness

of feeling that I was loved.- And that meant a lot to him

'cause he knew that godwould always be on his side,

he would deliver him, and hewould decide his plan in life.

- [John] The planincluded moving his family

and 18 others to Isaac Riley'sbrother's home in Kentucky.

When they got to Cincinnati,

Henson found his faithfulness tested.

Although Ohio was a free state

and many free black menencouraged them to stay,

he stood firm.

- He felt like he hadbeen tasked with this duty

and he was gonna fulfill it.

He had taken care of them

and they felt like if hewants us to carry along,

we'll go with him.

- [John] Henson came toregret that decision.

Three years after theirarrival in Kentucky,

those who followed himwere put up for auction.

- [Josiah] Husbands and wives,

parents and children, wereto be separated forever.

From that hour I saw through,

hated, and cursed thewhole system of slavery.

One absorbing purpose occupied my soul,

to gain freedom, self-assertion,

and deliverance from the cruel caprices

and fortunes of dissolute tyrants.

- [John] Because ofHenson's management skills,

he and his family were initiallyallowed to stay together.

Two years later, however,his time had come.

The only option, escape.

A major obstacle was theFugitive Slave Act of 1793,

which meant he and hisfamily could be captured

even in a free state.

So he set his sights on Canada.

- It was a 600-mile journey

that he would have to make on foot

with his wife and four children,

traveling by night, sleepingby day, super dangerous.

But he knows he's got to go to Canada.

It's the only place thathe can truly be a free man.

- [John] His wife made a sling for Josiah

to carry the two youngestchildren on his back.

With only the North Star as their guide,

the Henson family began their journey.

After 40 grueling days,they arrived at Lake Erie

just across the water from Canada.

A sympathetic ship captainoffered to take them

the rest of the way.

- [Josiah] He put his hand on my head

and said, "Be a good fellow, won't you?"

I felt streams of emotion running down

in electric courses from head to foot.

"Yes," said I, "I'll use my freedom well."

- [John] Henson helped starta black settlement in Ontario,

including a multiracial school,

almost unheard of at the time.

To raise money and awareness,

he preached throughout theUnited States and England,

where he was granted a privateaudience with Queen Victoria.

During those years, he risked his life

to help a total of 118 slavesreach freedom in Canada.

- He's an inspiration for me personally,

and I hope for many peopleas they hear this story,

to use our freedom well,

to use our resources, our time, our money,

our energy, our voice, our influence,

to use it on behalf ofthose with less than us.

- Near the end of his life,

Josiah Henson returned theplantation he once managed.

Although many of his experiences here

were unimaginably painful, hecould see God's hand in them,

later writing sharp flashes of lightning

come from black clouds.

John Jessup, CBN News, reportingin Rockville, Maryland.

- [George] And you can seemore of our great stories

at our websites, ourChristian World News website.

Find it at CBNNews.com.

We'll be back right after this.

- [Pat] When you give,

smiles grow bigger.

When you care,

homes are happier.

When you comfort,

the hurt goes away.

When we all come together to love

miracles happen.

- Hello, I'm Terry Meeuwsen.

Did you know there are morethan 148 million orphans

in the world today?

148 million.

But it was three little girls

that taught me aboutthe plight of orphans.

My husband and I spent nearly a month

immersed in the daily activitiesof a Ukrainian orphanage

as we waited to adopt three sisters.

I saw firsthand the utterloneliness, the pain of rejection,

and the overwhelming desire to be loved.

That experience changedme forever, and out of it

grew a ministry from my heartcalled Orphan's Promise.

Today, we're helping orphansand vulnerable children

in more than 50 countries worldwide.

Thousands of childrenare now in safe homes,

they're being educated, andthey're learning life skills.

I'm asking you to join with me

and become family to these children.

Will you call the numberon your screen right now?

Because every child deservesa chance to be happy.

- Hello?

Is this thing on?

Hey kids.

Do you love games?

And do you love discovering things?

(explosion)Yeah!

Well do you?- Yeah!

- [Announcer] Then you're gonna love this.

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(upbeat music)

- [Man] Young people, millennials,are flocking to church.

- [Woman] It's not an exaggeration to say

that we love to meet them

and that we love to know their stories.

- What happens when a remote tribal group

receives God's word in their own language

for the very first time?

If it's Papua, Indonesia,the answer is a huge party.

Stan Jeter brings usthis remarkable story.

- [Stan] The singing and dancing began

as the tribespeople gathered

near the small mountainairstrip in Papua, Indonesia.

- We're here to celebrate

the finishing of the completeBible in the Hupla language.

So this is it.

This is exciting stuff for us.

We've been partneringwith the missionaries

that have been workingto translate this thing

for years and years and years

and so it's just great to be able to come

and join them in the celebration.

- [Stan] For the past 40 years,

Brown and other Mission Aviation pilots

have flown the translating team

in and out of the Soba Airstrip.

One frequent passenger was SueTrenear, an Irish missionary.

She helped Christian tribesmentranslate the Old Testament.

- We're sitting here on thetop of the Soba Airstrip

where the first plane landed here in 1968.

Most of the Hupla tribeof 3,000 people are busy

digging pits to cook these pigs

and they'll be having services,they'll be praising God

and singing as all differentgroups from different churches.

So all we're seeing here islike a Hupla tribal party.

- [Stan] It took over 200roasted pigs to feed the crowd.

The spears the men carry are real,

but after the gospel arrived 50 years ago,

they stopped using them in tribal warfare.

The New Testament wastranslated into their language

and the newly foundedchurch began to grow.

During this event, 26converts were baptized.

But the highlight of the celebration

was the delivery of thecompleted Hupla Bible.

- This people grouphas had the translation

in the New Testament for a while.

And what really makes thisdedication today unique

is that it completes the story.

It's the Old Testament.

- [Stan] The first Bibleswere given to a young man

representing the youth, to awoman to stand for all women,

and to an older man recognizingthose who had waited

many years for the entireBible in their language.

According to Wycliffe Bible Translators,

over 1,800 languages are still waiting

for the start of a Bibletranslation project.

Stan Jeter, CBN News.

- Wow, absolutely incredible.

Well folks, thank you so muchfor joining us this week.

Until next week, from allof us here at CBN News,

wish you a fantastic weekend.

Goodbye and God bless you.

(dramatic music)

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